LLM Laws – Pathway

Required Credits/Units: 180

Core Modules

Module Credits/Units: 20

Module Aims:

  • To develop students’ knowledge of, and ability to utilise, appropriate legal (and other) research methods

Content Summary:

  • Introduction to the principles, aims and objectives of legal research;
  • Methodologies specific to legal research – doctrinal research and socio-legal research – and accessing and evaluating primary legal materials; legal policy research and accessing and evaluating secondary materials (including ‘soft’ law, policy documentation, codes of practice, Parliamentary materials, academic sources);
  • Undertaking and completing a literature review;
  • Research Methodologies: quantitative and qualitative research methods, including data collection, structured, semi-structured and unstructured interviews, surveys and questionnaires;
  • Ethical issues in research;
  • Reporting on the results of research;
  • Formulating a proposal for a dissertation.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Knowledge and critical understanding of legal and other research methodologies and their practical and ethical implications.
  2. Ability to identify and utilise methods appropriate to particular types of legal research and to formulate a proposal for a piece of research to form the basis of a dissertation.

Module Credits/Units: 20

Module Aims:

  • To introduce knowledge and understanding of the law relating to companies in the UK including the different types of incorporated bodies;
  • focusing on private companies but also PLCs in relation to corporate governance issues;
  • to develop competence in the application of company law to complex legal problems;
  • to develop critical analysis, evaluation and synthesis of company law; and
  • to expose and explore current problems and dilemmas in company law such as corporate governance and shareholder engagement

Content Summary:

  • The module provides a wide-ranging examination of the rules in relation to company law and examines legislative and judicial decisions and their impact on business, society and individuals
  • The role of directors in corporate management and the duties of directors at common law and under the Companies Act 2006
  • The role of shareholders in particular as a monitor of directors’ performance and in terms of corporate governance and listed PLCs –shareholder activism and engagement and also the impact of non-statutory codes
  • The constitution of companies, company procedures for holding meetings and the different rules for directors, shareholders and written resolutions
  • Share capital – differing types of shares, procedures for issuing and transferring shares. Other procedures e.g. reduction of capital
  • Other types of funding – debt capital
  • Remedies for shareholders – derivative actions and unfair prejudice on a minority
  • Rules on insider trading and FSMA 2000

Learning Outcomes

  1. To demonstrate a comprehensive and in-depth knowledge of the law relating to companies and how those laws operate
  2. To critically analyse, evaluate and apply laws relating to company law to complex legal problems
  3. To critically analyse the effects of corporate governance in relation to PLCs and large private companies (as appropriate)


Module Credits/Units: 20

Module Aims

  • To introduce knowledge and understanding of the law relating to the formation, regulation and discharge of commercial contracts and the legal protection afforded to consumers;
  • to develop competence in the application of commercial and consumer law to complex legal problems;
  • to achieve a critical ability in analysis, evaluation and synthesis of commercial and consumer law; and
  • to expose and explore current problems and dilemmas in commercial and consumer cases.

Content Summary:

  • The module provides a wide-ranging examination of the rules of in relation to commercial and consumer law and examines legislative and judicial decisions and their impact on business and the rights bestowed upon consumers when contracting with a business.
  • An examination of the development of domestic and European legislations, and the civil and criminal controls in relation to commercial and consumer contracts.
  • The specific areas which will be looked at in more detail include: agency; sale of goods, transfer of property; supply of goods/services; product liability; unfair trading practices, collective action and remedies.

Learning Outcomes

  1. To demonstrate a high level knowledge of the law relating to commercial and consumer law.
  2.  To critically analyse, evaluate and apply laws relating to commercial and consumer law contracts.
  3. To assess the role and obligations of different governmental and non-governmental agencies in terms of commercial practice, trading standard and consumer protection.


Module Credits/Units: 20

Module Aims:

  • To introduce students to the historical development of international human rights protection;
  • to introduce students to the procedural and institutional framework of international human rights protection;
  • to expose and explore current problems and dilemmas; and
  • to foster a critical awareness of both substantive and procedural aspects of human rights protection.

Content Summary:

  • The module will examine international human rights law within the international political, economic and social contexts in which rights emerge and develop.
  • The module begins with an historical examination of the philosophical and legal foundations of the international human rights regime. Issues around universalism and relativism are explored.
  • Civil and political rights and economic, social and cultural rights are analysed in terms of content and scope drawing out the perception that economic, social and cultural rights are conceived differently from civil and political rights.
  • State obligations are addressed before the course turns to examine right justiciability.
  • The mechanisms established under the auspices of the United Nations charged with the protection of international human rights are examined. The various committees charged with monitoring implementation of the Convention based system are analysed to assess the efficiency of the different approaches.
  • The effects of globalisation on international human rights are examined. Particular focus is placed on the growth and accountability of international actors and their impact on international human rights.
  • Particular group rights that have warranted specific protection under international law are considered including those of minorities, indigenous people and children.
  • The module ends with the work of non-governmental organisations and their impact on the international human rights community and the potential dangers their strength may imply.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Analysis and critical appreciation of the enforcement mechanisms employed to protect international human rights law.
  2. Identification and critical analysis of the scope of and limits to a selective range of substantive human rights.
  3. Critical appreciation of the interplay between politics and human rights in the international context.


Module Credits/Units: 20

Module Aims:

  • To develop a critical awareness of the role of the civil law in generating enforceable rights and the increasing global reach of domestic law;
  • To develop a detailed understanding and critical appreciation of the operation of the civil law of obligations in terms of the concept of ‘legal duty’;
  • To develop a detailed understanding and critical appreciation of the concepts of ‘strict’ and ‘fault-based’ liability;
  • To identify the major elements of the Anglo-Welsh system and its common law, equitable and statutory remedies.

Content Summary:

  • The tort of negligence, statutory torts and the principle of vicarious liability will be considered. Where relevant the potential for the extra-territorial reach of tortious liability will be examined
  • The process of contractual formation and remedies for breach will be considered. An overview of factors which can limit the obligations within contractual relations will be considered, such as causation, illegality, content, exclusion, mistake, frustration and duress
  • The Human Rights Act (HRA), 1998 (and related relevant case law) and its indirect impact on civil obligations between private parties will be examined critically.
  • Throughout, the student will be required to access primary and secondary legal sources relating to the torts, contract and HRA, utilising the secondary sources to develop their critical understanding and analysis of the substantive law.

Learning Outcomes

  1.  To identify the legal and conceptual frameworks applicable to the study of law
  2. Conduct effective research into the law making process and collate and constructively discriminate amongst independent sources.
  3. To demonstrate the skills learnt to undertake independent legal research.


Module Credits/Units: 20

Module Aims:

  • To provide an understanding of the principles, sources and jurisdiction of International and European law and the role of key actors

Content Summary:

  • Public International law – Principles, sources, key actors
  • Enforcement / the resolution of disputes
  • The relationship between national and international law
  • Private international law – Principles, sources, key actors
  • Jurisdiction, Choice of law, Recognition and Enforcement of Judgments
  • European Union law – Institutions, sources
  • The relationship between EU and national law
  • Enforcement of EU law
  • Substantive issues e.g. the four freedoms, competition
  • EFTA and the EEA
  • The Council of Europe – Principles, institutions, sources, enforcement

Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of International and European laws
  2. Demonstrate an ability to critically analyse and apply International and European laws
  3. Demonstrate an ability to produce academic writing to a high standard of scholarship, including writing effectively in the English language and presenting information and ideas in a manner that meets relevant academic conventions

 

Module Credits/Units: 60

Module Aims:

  • To provide an opportunity to conduct independent legal research and to produce a legal dissertation which utilises appropriate research methods, critically reviews the law and literature, develops an argument and reaches appropriate conclusions.

Content Summary:

  • The content is unique to each dissertation.
  • In the case of named pathways, the subject matter of the dissertation must relate to the pathway

Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate an ability to select, critique and utilise appropriate research methods
  2. Demonstrate an ability to critically analyse and evaluate a complex area of law and to reach appropriate conclusions
  3. Demonstrate an ability to produce a coherent legal dissertation, which is written and presented in accordance with relevant academic conventions

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